She Called It, Wolf By Cyn Bagley

She turned towards the hanger doors as the shooting started. A strange man in his thirties, dark hair and brown eyes in cammies with an M-16, sprayed the line with bullets. Most of the soldiers had already handed in their small arms. They were sitting ducks. In only seconds the screaming and groans started. EJ slammed to the floor. She could smell the coppery eaint of blood. The young soldier next to her was lying in a pool of blood. It spread towards her. He gasped and then his eyes died.

It was then she became angry. One of her men, her unit, had died in front of her and she had done nothing. How could this creature kill U.S. soldiers on U.S. soil. The anger grew from her belly and encompassed her mind. In her mind’s eye she saw a small wolf walk towards her and sniff. EJ jumped. She had never seen such a creature before. Her head pushed into the concrete she tried to move away from the wolf. It was in her so she had nowhere to go. The shooter noticed her small movements and pulled his weapon towards her. It was then he saw the explosion of skin and fur. EJ still felt anger as she leaped towards this killer.

This paranormal novel was quite interesting and not at all typical of other paranormal type books with wolves in them. While the wolves of Twilight could transform themselves rather quickly into wolves, the other shapeshifters in She Called It, Wolf had more difficulty changing. Except for EJ, the main female character, who seemed to do this effortlessly.

EJ comes home from the army only to find out that her uncle has already passed away. She inherits his trailer and everything her uncle had. She also inherits a dog named Barkley, some new friends, a gold mine, a bunch of goats, a donkey and also, a guy named Adam.

Adam is the small-town sheriff of Felony Falls. But Adam and the whole town hold a secret. Many of this small town are shapeshifters or married to one. When two of the towns upstanding citizens are murdered in front of their young children, and the children are kidnapped, the town goes crazy trying to find these kids without giving away their secret to outsiders.

EJ herself is a shapeshifter, which is quite unheard of. Only a few in the history of the wolves have been women, and none of them can change as fast as she can. That is the questions that are left unanswered. Why is she the only female wolf, and why can she change so easily, when it takes some of the wolves up to 15 minutes to go through this painful change? EJ seems to be able to change on the fly, and at will.

EJ finds herself staking claim to the old mine that her uncle had, but in the process, stumbles upon a building out in the middle of nowhere. She ends up finding the children there. The children are abused and tortured, having experiments done on them. One of them almost dies in the process of these experiments.

While rescuing the children, we find out something else about EJ that makes her different from the other shapeshifters. I’m not going to tell you what it is…you’ll have to read the book to find that out.

I like that the author made the wolves a bit different than the wolves from other novels, but it sounded downright painful and I know if I was watching the movie, I wouldn’t want to wait that long before the wolf appeared.

I also like the special surprise ability that EJ exhibits at the end, and I also like that her wolf would talk to her, soothing her and helping her with the decisions she had to make.

I thought the ending could have been a little stronger, but overall, a pretty good book. There were some editing problems, grammar and spelling mistakes, but those are easily fixed and a good reviewer (and reader) can get past those mistakes to see the real story behind it.

Overall, I give this story 4 stars.

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5 Comments

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5 responses to “She Called It, Wolf By Cyn Bagley

  1. Thank you – Beth – very nice
    Cyn

  2. Excellent review. It sounds like a good story. Now all I need is time!

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